Parts Feed: Component Searches – December 2014

Each month we’re compiling a list of part searches from Findchips.com & Parts.io, taken from Supplyframe’s ranked search feed.  From that list we’ve stripped out the standard fare (e.g. discrete resistors & capacitors in chip packages – 0402, 0603, 0805, etc) and what’s left is a snapshot of what you and others are searching for and our comments on some of the items we found curious.

10. MPL3115A2

Category:  Pressure Sensor

Slipping in just under the wire is the Xtrinsic MPL3115A2 I2C Precision Altimeter (altitude, pressure, & temperature actually) from Freescale.  This device touts pressure, altitude and temperature in a modestly sized 8pin LGA package, accessible over I2C.   Geared for various supply voltages, this device includes an internal LDO and IO voltages are calculated as a function of its 1.95 V to 3.6 V supply range.  A development kit exists complete with software resources available from Freescale’s distributors.

9.  NCP3170ADR2G

Category: Switching Regulator IC

Weighing in at number 9 is the NCP3170 buck converter from the folks over at On Semiconductor.  For a DC-DC converter, this device comes cheap (<$0.40) for what’s a proven, pretty versatile switcher.  Input voltage range is anywhere from 4.5V up to 18V and the device supports output voltages as low as 0.8V with output current as high as 3A.   Efficiency looks good with 90%+ at >3V & with the PWM running @ 500kHz (they have a 1Mhz version as well).

NCP3170

8.  HMC1043

Category: Magnetic Field Sensor

Number 8 is a fan-favorite of the Phy team (though pricey if not purchased at volume), the HMC1043 3-axis magnetic field sensor from Honeywell.  These do not come cheap (easily $10-20) but they’re certainly clever devices with low noise & a wide magnetic range, intended for use in compass / magnetometry applications.  At 3x3mm these devices are super small indeed and at only 1.2mm high, you can expect the intended applications include mobile phones and tablets.

The HMC1043 also supports a wide input voltage range of between 1V8 and 10V, making it easy to build a module and slot that in to numerous applications where direction might be useful input to have.

HMC1043_DS

7.  mc33078dr

Category:  Operational Amplifier IC

In the 7 slot this month is the MC33078DR dual opamp from TI, amongst others.  This device has audio-worthy precision with a total harmonic distortion of just 0.002%.  It also supports single / dual supply operation of ±5 V to ±18 V, boasts low noise at 4.5 nV/√Hz, high gain bandwidth of 16MHz, and a high 7 V/µs slew rate.

MC33078

6.  OP400GPZ

Category:  Operational Amplifier IC

Number 6 for December was the OP400GPZ from Analog Devices, which stands out as a monolithic quad opamp with low input offset voltage (150uV) and a drift of less than 1.2 µV/°C.  This sort of precision from a quad device is awesome but does come at a price.  Contrast this to the OP77 and you’ll find there’s a definite tradeoff between board area, complexity and cost that has to be considered.

5.  MRFE6S9060NR1

Category: RF Power FET

Weighing in at number 5 is an RF FET from our friends at Freescale, the MRFE6S9060NR1.  This is an 880 MHz, 14 W / 28 V, Single N-CDMA Lateral N-Channel Broadband RF Power MOSFET “designed for broadband commercial and industrial applications with frequencies up to 1000 MHz.”

4.  AT45DB642D-TU

Category:  Programmable ROM

Number 4 on our list is the AT45DB642D-TU, a 64M, 66MHz, dual interface flash from Adesto Technologies (used to be Atmel, division was sold to Adesto back in 2012).  This device boasts some cool erase options including page, block, sector and whole chip, as well as sector-level data protection and lockdown features as well as a 128-byte security register.  It also includes two interfaces, both the RapidS Serial Interface which clocks in at 66MHz and is compatible with SPI modes 0 & 3, and also the Rapid8 8-bit Interface (50MHz); which are intended for situations where multiple devices require access to the same flash, such as a DSP and a micro riding shotgun (or vice versa).

adesto logo

3.  1N4007

Category:  Signal Diode

Coming up bronze for December is the 1N4007, part of the 1N400x series of silicon rectifier diodes with an average forward current of 1A, Vfof 1V, a 2-3 uS recovery time & boasting a maximum repetitive reverse blocking voltage of 1KV.

diode

2.  2N7002

Category:  Small Signal FET

‘And for the Silver?’  December’s silver medal goes to an old standard, one of the famed “FETlington,’ line from Siliconix, the 2N7002.  This little beauty is a later derivative of the 2N7000 and is an N-Channel FET that is hard to beat…Also a fav amongst Phy staffers! Great for switches and drivers, also level translation, this little bugger boasts a max Vds of 60V, drain current of 300mA, and power dissipation of 0.83W.  Rds(on) ranges between 2.8 and 5Ω.

On the Findchips details page you will find a looong list of TI designs that all use the 2N7002 in  varying ways — a testament to its versatility!

1.  1N4148

Category:  Signal Diode

Perhaps not the most glamorous of parts, this little diode continues it’s reign as the most common silicon switching diode in history…And probably one of the longest-lived of any parts still common in production PCBs.  In fact, the first recorded mention from TI for the 1N4148 goes back to 1966!  Putting that in perspective — Lyndon Johnson was president of the United States (Nixon would come next), Charles De Gaulle was the president of France (not yet an airport) & Ken Kesey was conducting the first “Acid Tests” in San Francisco.

Diode_1n4148

The 1N4148 has certainly secured it’s place in history for good reason:  fast switching speed & fast recovery time (4nS), 300mA max direct forward current, a 75V peak (repetitive) reverse breakdown voltage (100V non-repetitive), and a cost that is near impossible to beat ($0.007 pp from Avnet, $0.004 in 10K qty!).  If you’re after designs to get started with this little gem, have a look at the details page on Findchips.  We show 89 reference designs that include the 1N4148 from TI alone!

 

 


 

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